Affiliate Disclosure: Some of the links or advertisements below are affiliate links or advertisements, meaning, at no additional cost to you. We will earn a commission, if you click through and make a purchase. Thank you 🙂

People that love rain are called pluviophiles. The word pluviophile comes from the Latin word “pluvial,” which means rain, and “phile,” which denotes a thing or a person. Therefore, a pluviophile is a lover of rain, or someone that finds joy and peace of mind during the rainy days.

GREG RAKOZY ROMAN TEN

Leave a Reply

You May Also Like
Read More

The Wends

The frustration that you’re not enjoying an experience as much as you should, even something you’ve worked for…
Read More

Trumspringa

The temptation to step off your career track and become a shepherd in the mountains, following your flock…
Read More

Dead Reckoning

To find yourself bothered by someone’s death more than you would have expected. As if you assumed they…
Read More

Lapyear

The age at which you become older than your parents were when you were born, which signals that…
Read More

Pâro

The feeling that no matter what you do is always somehow wrong—that any attempt to make your way…
Read More

Meliorism

The belief that the world gets better, the belief that humans can improve the world. In other words,…
Read More

Anecdoche

A conversation in which everyone is talking but nobody is listening, simply overlaying disconnected words like a game of…
Read More

Occhiolism

The awareness of the smallness of your perspective, by which you couldn’t possibly draw any meaningful conclusions at…
Read More

Lutalica

When you were born they put you in a little box and slapped a label on it. But…
Read More

Deep Cut

An emotion you haven’t felt in years that you might have forgotten completely if your emotional playlist hadn’t been left…
Read More

Yù Yī

The desire to see with fresh eyes, and feel things just as intensely as you did when you…
Read More

Dès Vu

The awareness that this moment will become a memory. Derived from French dès vu, “seen as soon as”…
Read More

Ringlorn

The wish that the modern world felt as epic as the one depicted in old stories and folktales—a…
Read More

Ameneurosis

The half-forlorn, half-escapist ache of a train whistle calling in the distance at night. Coined in 2012 by…
Read More

Vellichor

The strange wistfulness of used bookstores, which are somehow infused with the passage of time. It’s filled with…